Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Aquaculture & Fisheries Brisbane, Australia.

Day 2 :

OMICS International Aquaculture-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Osman Samsun photo
Biography:

Osman Samsun is Professor and also acting Head of Fishing Gear Technology Division of Sinop university. He has supervised and coordinated 9 master and 4 doctorate degrees as an academic consultant in the field of Main Technology of Catching at the Faculty of Sinop Sea Products. Currently he is supervising 1 master and 1 doctorate degrees at the university

Abstract:

The Black Sea fish have been shared by Bulgaria, Romania, Georgia, Ukraine, Russia Federation and Turkey. Anchovy is the most major capture fish species in the Black Sea and the most amounts was caught annually by Turkey and Georgia. About 250-300000 tons anchovy was caught annually in Turkish fishermen using purse-seine and mid-water trawl. The anchovy shoals were found to have migrated to the Georgian coasts thus preventing the Turkish anchovy fishing in recent years. Because of this, most of the Turkish fish meal and fish oil factories which use pelagic fish especially anchovy as a raw material relocated to Georgia. In the Turkish Seas, fishing regulation is based on the minimum mesh and fish size, closed season and area, species under full conservation, completely banned fishing methods and fishing gears, gear restriction for identified species and gear or fishing method restrictions and some restrictions concerning pollutants. There are some anchovy fishing regulations such as time (16:00 PM-06:00 AM), length (9 cm TL is size of sexual maturity length), depth (24 m), gear types and nets. But in Georgia legal catch length is applied as 7 cm TL. Furthermore, in recent years there have been changes in breeding, feeding and wintering areas of the anchovy. International agreements for anchovy fisheries should be built to sustainable management plans such as joint protection measures and control system. In this study, a total of 1833 European anchovy caught by purse seine were sampled during the 2014 and 2015 fishing season in the Black Sea coast of Turkey. The total length ranged between 6.0 and 14.0 cm (mean 11.03±0.025 cm). The length-weight relationships were estimated as W=0.0108TL2.7534 (r2=0.9134, n=1833, sdlogTL=0.0464, sdlogW=0.1338, P<0.001). The slope of the length-weight relationship regression lines (Pauly’s t test=12.434) were significantly different from the isometric growth curve slope (b=3). These results showed that anchovy have negative allometric growth characteristics. Monthly length frequency distribution showed that the amount of the anchovy under the size at sexual maturity and legal size (9 cm) was found as 5.07% indicating groups of small individuals were caught minor level anchovy fisheries in the study areas. However, a stock assessment and management of this species in the Black Sea is urgently needed. To protect anchovy stock and to build sustainable anchovy fisheries in the Black Sea, some management measures such as total allowable catch and landing quotas, exclusive regional fishing permits or closed area, partner minimum fish size (example 9 cm total length) should be applied as soon as possible by six countries bordering the Black Sea.

  • Track 2: Fish Habitat Ecology and Conservation
    Track 4: Aquaculture and Biosystem Research
    Track 5: Aquatic Organism’s Byproducts and Their Application
    Track 7: Zebra Fish : A Biological Model Organism
    Track 8: Diversification in Aquaculture
Speaker

Chair

Kirsten Hiemann

Associate Professor
James Cook University
Australia

Speaker

Co-Chair

Chaoshu Zeng

Associate Professor
James Cook University
Australia

Session Introduction

Kazuko Miyagawa Kohshima

Wildlife Research Center of Kyoto University
Japan

Title: Embryonic learning of chemical cues via the parents host in Anemonefish (Amphiprion ocellaris)
Speaker
Biography:

Kazuko Miyagawa-Kohshima completed her PhD from Kyoto University and Postdoctoral studies from the Suntory Institute for Bioorganic Research. She along with colleagues succeeded to identify some attractants which functions in anemonefish-sea anemone partnerships. She has taught biology and ethology as a part-time Lecturer in Kyoto Institute of Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Komazawa University, and Atomi University. Currently, she is working as a Researcher in the Wildlife Research Center of Kyoto University. He main research interest lies in solving problems of the fascinating symbiosis between anemonefish and sea.

Abstract:

It is known that each anemone fish inhabits species-specific symbiotic anemone(s) in the Indo-Pacific Ocean, and has been demonstrated that each anemonefish juveniles reach their hosts by recognizing chemicals emitted from symbiotic anemone(s). We studied this species-specific host-recognition system of anemonefish experimentally, with a particular focus on the function of imprinting using naive Amphiprion ocellaris juveniles. We demonstrated the embryonic and immediate post-hatching learning of chemical cues via the parents' host in A. ocellaris through a host-exchange experiment with egg batches during hatching. This is why anemonefish parents lay their eggs very close to their host anemone, the eggs almost always touching the host's body or tentacles. The memory obtained from such imprinting operates at the time when juveniles first search for their hosts. Unexpectedly, innate recognition was found to exist not only in the symbiotic host species but also weakly in two non-partner species. Innate recognition alone is not sufficient. Imprinting via the parents' host complements innate recognition, leading to rigid species-specific host recognition. Imprinting by the parents' single host provides a sufficient cue for reaching the two host species. Furthermore, when combined with imprinting, innate recognition of non-partners serves to supplement the recognition of those species, leading to substitute partnerships that are only observed in some localities. In short, innate non-partnerrecognition is considered to be a type of spare recognition. We will discuss potential functions of imprinting in the host-recognition system.

Speaker
Biography:

Sébastien Hochard is PhD in Marine Environmental Science (University of Aix-Marseille, France) and specialized in the biogeochemical functioning of shallow coastal ecosystems. He achieved postdoctoral position at Ifremer and the University of New-Caledonia, and studied benthic pelagic coupling in shrimp pond monoculture and co culture with rabbit fish. He worked with ADECAL on the biogeochemical functioning of biofloc. He is now in charge of the HOBICAL project financed by the ZoNéco Program, which aim to insert the aquaculture of Holothuria. scabra in the New-Caledonian aquaculture based on shrimp production

Abstract:

Although sediment is considered as an important detritic component of earthen ponds used in shrimp production, benthic primary production is usually considered as negligible. Yet Benthic Micro Algae (BMA) are a major component of shallow marine ecosystem functioning. They produce labile organic matter at the sediment surface and control the nutrient exchanges at the water-sediment interface. Thus BMA may have an influence on the benthic pelagic coupling during the rearing period and influence the dynamics of water quality and phytoplankton communities. This may have direct consequences in the pond management strategy. These issues were investigated in the context of New Caledonian shrimp aquaculture, which is based on the rearing of Litopenaeus stylirostris in semi intensive pond. Author scientific approach included both industrial pond surveys and mesocosm experiments. Authors’ research showed that BMA could reach a biomass that exceeded phytoplankton biomass in both systems. BMA biomass was controlled by nutrient input (food), light availability and shrimp bioturbation. BMA activity had a significant contribution to the total pond metabolism and had an important role in the control of nutrient exchanges at the water-sediment interface. The controlling factors appeared to be different for nitrogen and phosphorus, leading to fluctuating release of nutrients from the sediment to the water column, both in term of fluxes and N/P ratio. These have direct consequences on the pond management. They had discuss these features in term of fertilization strategy, and pond sediment monitoring and management.

Speaker
Biography:

Mike Moore is an accomplished aquatic biologist with international experience in shrimp and finfish culture. He works for Keeton Industries, Incorporated, the manufacturer of aquaculture’s finest microbial products. He has worked for governmental and private organizations for 20 years, improving processes and production in the United States and internationally.

Abstract:

Where there is water there is bacteria. Determining the dominant species of bacteria and their role in your aquatic community is critical to improving cultural conditions and reducing susceptibility to disease and opportunistic pathogens. Whether you grow extensively, intensively, biofloc, or not, understanding the importance of managing your microbiology is paramount to the health and development of your crop. If you desire improved feed conversion, growth, and yield, and/or improved water quality, reduced organic load, environmental contamination, and bad odors, managing your microbial community can be the solution. Increasing yield and profits is most easily accomplished when you understand your microbiological conditions and utilize the appropriate species to improve cultural practices. Don’t leave your microbiological community to chance.

Speaker
Biography:

Maruf Kasim is a professor and Aquatic Resources and Conservation Specialist in Faculty of Fishery and Marine Science of Haluoleo University

Abstract:

Kappaphycusalvarezii and Eucheumadenticulatum are few species of seaweeds that widely cultivated by coastal community in Indonesia. However currently, Eucheumasp. production was significantly reduced caused by many problems such as herbivorous attack in field cultivation. This study aims to examine the effect of utilization of new seaweeds cultivation method on monthly production. New methods of seaweeds cultivation are floating cages. The research was conducted during March to December 2013 in Lakeba seaweeds cultivation area, Baubau city, Southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia. Underwater observation was conducted to observe the effect of floating cages on herbivorous. To calculate the effectives of Floating cages design, we were using three different design size of Floating cages, (200x200x50 cm, 200x400x50 cm and 100x400x50 cm). In terms to analyze the effect of floating cage on seaweeds production, we were compare the production of K. alverazii and Eucheumadenticulatum by using long line methods and floating cages methods.The results showed that the floating cages completely keep and eliminate pests on seaweed.Ideal size being used for the cultivation of seaweed are 100 x 400 x 60 cm. The size design, are highly mobile and easily moved to desired location. In the period of cultivation of 50 and 90 days was observed that E. denticulatum were cultured with floating cages have average growth 389.2 g and 865.8 g, respectively. While the cultivated with longline average growth is 236.7 g and 531.8 g, respectively. This shows a fairly significant difference of both. As for the K. alverazii seen that during the cultivation of 50 and 90 days, the average growth of the weight is 329.3 g and 740 g respectively. While cultured with longline, average growth is 177.5 g and 487.5 g, respectively.Growth K alvarazii, looks slower than the E. denticulatum. Trend growth of both species tend to be highly increased after 50 days and decreased after a 70-day maintenance period. The cultivation by using floating cages produces fairly good growth with no of pest attacks that can affect growth rates.

Speaker
Biography:

Mst Nahid Akter is now going to finish her PhD at the age of 35 years from Universiti Sains Malaysia under the School of Biological Sciences. She awarded as a PhD fellow by OWSD. She has teaching experience in a reputed public university in Bangladesh. She has published 1 paper in Aquaculture International journal and about 10 papers in reputed local Bangladeshi journals. She has attended 3 international symposium in various Asian countries and several workshop in Malaysia

Abstract:

The influence of the dietary probiotic, Lactobacillus acidophilus on growth performance, digestive enzyme activities, gut histo-morphology and microflora was determined in striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) juveniles. Four diets containing L. acidophilus at 103, 105, 107 and 109 CFU/g of diet and control (without L. acidophilus supplementation) were prepared and fed to triplicate groups of striped catfish juveniles (initial weight of 21.69±0.18 g) twice daily at 2.5% of fish body weight for 12 weeks. Weight gain, specific growth rate, feed conversion ratio and protein efficiency ratio in the groups fed 105 and 107 CFU/g of L. acidophilus were significantly improved (P<0.05) compared to the remaining treatment groups. Further, compared to control and fish fed low (103 CFU/g) L. acidophilus supplementation, those fed 105 and 107 CFU/g had significantly higher (P<0.05) apparent protein digestibility. Except for lipase activity, inclusion of L. acidophilus at 107 CFU/g diet significantly increased amylase and protease activities. Microscopic analysis showed that the villi length in both the anterior and posterior gut and microvilli length in the posterior gut only increased significantly (P<0.05) in fish fed L. acidophilus supplementation at 105 and 107 CFU/g of diet. The fish fed L. acidophilus supplemented diets significantly increased the total count of lactic acid bacteria in the gut of striped catfish compared to the control fed group. However, L. acidophilus supplementation did not show any significant effect of striped catfish survival. Based on gut histo-morphology and growth performance, inclusion of L. acidophilus at 105 CFU/g seem to have the most positive effect of striped catfish juvenile farming.

Speaker
Biography:

Nastaran Mazloumi was the University of Adelaide International Scholarship (ASI) holder since 2012 started the PhD at the age of 24. Graduated in bachelor of Fisheries engineering (Aquatics Ecology) and master of “Aquaculture” with experience in aquaculture engineering and fish physiology. Researched different aspects of marine and fresh water fish biology, ecology and physiology including, fish stocking and husbandry (from small to large sizes), working with different sizes of “Swim chamber respirometer” and metabolic rate measurements by “Lab chart” and “Auto-Resp” software, otolith chronology and modelling with ‘R’. She served as an expert in charge of research and process of warm water fish reproduction and culture from March 21, 2008 to June, 2011 in “Pisciculture Production Cooperative No.12 in Rasht, Iran. Authored and co-authored different articles and presented papers at domestic and international conferences

Abstract:

Climate change is predicted to affect populations of marine fish through effects on swimming behavior. Warming causes impairment of oxygen consumption and locomotion in ectotherms. We used generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) to determine the influence of four different temperatures (16, 19, 22 and 25°C) and two different levels of salinity (30ppt and 40ppt) on critical swimming performance (Ucrit) of juvenile King George whiting (Sillaginodes punctatus), a commercially and recreationally important temperate fish in southern Australia. When estimated the critical swimming performance (Ucrit) of the juveniles. Differences in Ucrit were largely explained by Salinity and increased by increasing salinity from 30 to 40ppt. Findings from the present study demonstrated that, despite of no meaningful relationship between the Ucrit and temperature at salinity 30ppt, Ucrit was higher in 22°C, at salinity 40ppt in compare with other temperatures. Evaluating physiological responses of juvenile fish to climate change is beneficial for understanding a thermal niche of individuals and estimating their adaptation to warming.

Speaker
Biography:

Fran Humphries is a PhD candidate at Griffith University researching the role of patent law defenses for sharing aquatic genetic material in aquaculture. She has worked as a Judge’s Associate, legal practitioner, policy maker, legislation drafter, mediator and law lecturer. Fran has developed significant policy and legislation for managing Queensland’s fisheries resources, aquaculture, agriculture and Indigenous customary fishing and has published in the area of patent law. Fran also holds a Bachelor of Arts/Laws (Honors) degree from the University of Queensland and a Master of Laws degree from Dalhousie University Canada specializing in Traditional Ecological Knowledge and the precautionary principle.

Abstract:

Patents can have both a positive and negative effect on innovation in aquaculture. On the one hand they may encourage investment for developing new strains. On the other hand, they may tie up genetic resources that may have otherwise been freely used by breeders or researchers. This presentation considers the role and use of patent law for protecting new strains in aquaculture from unauthorized replication. While patents are not yet as extensive in aquaculture compared with other fields, there are issues that need to be addressed from the outset to protect aquaculture’s increasingrole in global food security. A central problem for breeders is determining the extent to which progeny of self-replicating patented genetic material inventions may be controlled by the patent holder. In addressing this problem, the presentation highlights various defenses against infringement including those excusing experimental use of patented aquatic genetic material. It also explores breeding defenses and innocent bystander defenses that are emerging in agriculture but which also may have future relevance to aquaculture. The presentation concludes that as patents start to take hold in aquaculture, breeders need clarity on the circumstances in which they can make a cross with an aquatic strain that includes a patented genetic sequence or trait that is not expressed in their new strain.

Speaker
Biography:

Wahidatul Husna Zuldin has completed herBSc. Molecular Bioscience and Biotechnology from Rochester Institute of Technology, NY, USA at the age of 22 and Masters in Aquaculture from Universiti Malaysia Sabah at the age of 25.She has presented her research in International Conference on Marine Science and Aquaculture in 2013 and 2014. She is also the member of Asian Society of Ichthyologists after presented a paper on seahorses during Asian Fish Biodiversity Conference 2014.Indeed, she is an energetic young researcher who has keen interests in further exploring the world of aquaculture.

Abstract:

Little is known on the performance of seaweed cultivated in land-based facilities. The present study was conducted to determine the performance of Kappaphycussp.cultivated in customized raceway culture system. Two red seaweed species (K. alvarezii variety Brown Tambalang, BT and K. striatum variety Green Flower, GF) were selected and cultivated using suspended method of seaweed cultivation. Three 40-days trials were conducted in September until December 2014. The raceway tank was equipped with continuous high water flow with the inlet flow-rate of 625 mLs-1 and outlet flow-rate of 383 mLs-1, and optimum water parameters comprised of salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO) level, pH and light intensity ranged from 29.90 ppt to 34.65 ppt, 〖27.51〗^o C to 〖34.94〗^o C, 5.17 to 6.51, 7.69 to 8.64 and 5993 lux to 6004 lux, respectively. Based on the findings, red seaweed grew in the customized raceway tank with the average daily growth rate of 2.14±0.17 %〖 day〗^(-1) for K. striatum var. GF and 2.67±0.37 %〖 day〗^(-1)for K. alvarezii var. BT. No fertilizers or enrichments were added during the cultivation period. In conclusion, raceway tank can be successfully used in cultivating Kappaphycus sp. These findings are significant to provide a baseline data and facilitate the land-based seaweed farming in the future.

Speaker
Biography:

Deepika Anand is currently an PhD student in Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Versova, Andheri, West Mumbai, India

Abstract:

Shrimp aquaculture industry has faced severe economic losses due to devastating diseases affecting shrimp especially white spot syndrome (WSSV) and vibriosis which caused massive mortality in many species of penaeid shrimp. In order to generate protection strategies against diseases, it is essential to gain better understanding of the defense system of shrimp. Innate immunity is the first-line of defense in shrimps. Previously, we characterised MyD88 and TRAF6, two innate immune genes in the Toll pathway of Penaeus monodon and studied the response of these genes against WSSV challenge both in vivo and in vitro which revealed that Toll-pathway in P. monodon responds to WSSV infection. Dorsal (NF-kappa B homolog) and Cactus (IkB homolog), two downstream signalling molecules in the Toll-pathway have been characterised from Litopenaeus vannamei and Fenneropenaeus chinensis showing varied antibacterial/antiviral response. In the present study, the temporal expression profiles of Dorsal and Cactus from tiger shrimp, P. monodon in response to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and Vibrio harveyi was studied in post-larvae and selected tissues of juvenile of P.monodon after immersion challenge as well as upon injection in adult shrimp. Moreover, the response of these genes was also studied upon WSSV challenge in vitro in primary haemocyte cultures of P. monodon. PmCactus and PmDorsal displayed varying expression pattern in response to immersion challenge with WSSV in PL-18 and most of the tested tissues of juveniles. However, complete down-regulation of PmDorsal could be noticed in hepatopancreas at all time points. Upon injection, PmCactus expression was up-regulated in haemocytes and lymphoid organ at most of the time-points tested. Peak up-regulation was observed at 24 hours post-infection for both gill and midgut. PmDorsal expression was up-regulated in haemocytes and gill at all time-points. However, up-regulation was noticed only at few time-points for both lymphoid organ and midgut. PmCactus and PmDorsal showed up-regulated expression in response to WSSV at early time-points tested, 6 hours and 2 hours respectively in vitro in primary haemocyte cultures. Similarly, varied temporal expression pattern of these immune-relevant genes could be noticed upon challenge with Vibrio harveyi. The modulation of expression of these genes in response to WSSV in vivo as well as in vitro and V. harveyi in vivo suggests their possible role in immune responses in shrimp against viruses as well as bacteria.

Speaker
Biography:

Nieva J A is currently working on Seaweed Chemistry in The Marine Science Institute, Velasquez St, University of the Philippines

Abstract:

Somatic (wet weight and equatorial and polar test diameters), gonad production (gonadosomatic index) and gonad quality (color) of the sea urchin T.gratilla reared in plastic basins to determine the effect of light exposure were done in vitro from December 2011 to May 2012. The experiment consisted of four treatments with three equal replications arranged in a completely randomized design as follows: Treatment I - 12 hours exposure; Treatment II - 8 hours exposure; Treatment III - 4 hours exposure; and Treatment IV - no exposure time. Results show that organisms in treatments III and IV had significantly (p≤0.05) higher growth rates (wet weight and test diameters) than the organisms in treatments I and II. In terms of gonad growth (GSI) and quality (color), the organisms reared in shorter light exposure time showed significantly better gonad quality than those in longer light exposure time. However, it was noted that the gonads of the organisms in treatment IV (no light exposure time) are less firm and liquefies when exposed to the air than in the other treatments particularly that of Treatment III. It is therefore recommended that T. gratilla can be best reared in covered plastic basins with four hours exposure time.

Speaker
Biography:

Sajal Kole is currently a PhD student in Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Versova, Andheri, West Mumbai, India

Abstract:

Edwardsiella tarda (E. tarda) is the common pathogen which causes enormous losses in culture of commercially important fish species globally. Incapability of antibiotic agents to control edwardsiellosis had lead to the idea of DNA based immunization. It has been proven that the expression of an antigen or antigens from plasmid DNA (pDNA) may elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses. To improve the efficiency of the vaccine constructs against fish pathogen novel methods to deliver this DNA to fish are under investigation because vaccination through parental routes like intra muscular/intra peritoneal etc put fish into lot of stress and also practically not viable in aquaculture. Nanotechnology can be a promising intervention in increasing the effectiveness of DNA vaccines. Chitosan can be a potential candidate as a polycationic gene carrier for oral as well as immersion administration of DNA vaccines in fishes. The present study examines the potential efficacy of DNA vaccine against E. tarda through oral and immersion route using chitosan nanoparticles conjugation. The GAPDH gene of E. tarda and IFN-γ of Labeo rohita as an adjuvant was used to construct bicistronic DNA vaccine using pIRES, a eukaryotic expression vector. Expression study of the DNA construct in cell culture was conducted to check the transgene expression. The transfected SSN I cells were processed for SDS-PAGE and western blotting to see the GAPDH expression. RT-PCR was conducted using mRNA from transfected cells to check IFN-γ gene presence. The in vitro expressions of both the genes prove the potential of this particular vaccine construct. The chitosan nanoparticles were used to deliver the constructed plasmid. A significant decrease in the superoxide production, myeloperoxidase was observed in the vaccinated fish. However the total immunoglobulin level and serum lysozyme activity was raised in the immunised fishes. After vaccination L. Rohita were intraperitoneally challenged with E. tarda. A relative percent survival (RPS) rate of 8% and 75% was recorded in orally and immersion administered fishes respectively against 55% in unvaccinated fishes. The results indicate that the vaccinated rohu with chitosan-DNA construct showed high protection against experimental E. tarda infection. This study also elucidates the changes in the absolute expression of different immune genes in different tissues of L. rohita administered with the DNA construct conjugated with chitosan nanoparticles through oral and immersion route. The results are compared with the expression in naive control fishes showing significant up regulation at post vaccination and 6 hr, 12 hr and 48 hpc.